Drawing deposit of Yamneko

“Dude, suckin’ at something is the first step to being sorta good at something.”

conceptcookie:

The 115 Citizen Hand Photos for References are up and ready for you guys to download! Check them out here:http://cgcookie.com/concept/2013/02/28/concept-cookie-resources-photo-references/

(via retrocausal)

freeglassart said: You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

unamusedsloth:

Comic strip artists from the 40’s draw their characters while blindfolded

(Source: unamusedsloth, via starrcat)

Anonymous said: can I ask how you pick your colors, they're so vivid??

kelpls:

I ACTUALL Y HAVE NO SYSTEM i just go with my gut ha hahaa. .. but I GUESS IN GENERAL Don’t be afraid to use saturated colors!! AS LONG AS YOU HAVE A BALANCE OF SATURATED AND DESATURATED COLOR YOU WON”T END UP BLINDING YOURSELF!

THIS IS JUST A GENERAL GUIDE cause whether a color looks saturated/ desaturated also depends on the colors around it!! and black and white can kinda go either way depending on things BUT USUALLY AS U MOVE TOWARDS THE GREYS = less saturated

SAT = SATURATED; DESAT= DESATURATED

 here’s a screenshot of my swatches where i sometimes save colors i like!

they’re mostly skin colors though SWEATS.. 

THERE”S ALSO THIS VIDEO THAT I WATCHED TODAY and I actually color in a rly similar way?? SO MAYBE IT MIGHT HELP
omg im not sure if i answered your question

leseanthomas:

"Ed (Edward Wong Hau Pepelu Tivruski IV)” was a boy at the planning stage. I got a request to draw the characters sitting on a chair with each of their personalities shown for the planning document. I was told Ed’s character was still pending and that she was a boy at first. (laughs) I’ve  also drawn a number of illustrations with backgrounds to show the setting. It seems like another character is in place of Ed here.” - Toshihiro Kawamoto, Character Designer, Animation director of Cowboy Bebop

———————————————————————-

That one time when Ed was actually a young, black hacker kid w/ dreads as part of the Bebop crew, until final decisions/direction designed turned him into a girl. :-)

Memoris from Kawamoto’s Bebop art book, “The Wind”

(via sweetteasparrow)

Anonymous said: I was wondering how you manage to make your faces actually look like the person they are meant to look like? Some of my facial features always end up looking the same, and yours are so perfect... *showers you with love* You are my art guru.

thetuxedos:

art guru!!!!

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ART GURU.

BUT NO in all seriousness, thank you! You’re a sweetheart! ;O; Proportions are pretty awful to get down when you’re just starting out, and while there are a bunch of ways you can start practicing with it, it’ll be difficult to be absolutely precise. I still struggle with proportions occasionally. Fun fact: I don’t post all of my work. I only post the work that turned out okay aHA. So basically don’t be frustrated when every single piece doesn’t turn out. Here are a few tips.

Let’s use this picture of Laurence and Hugh because why not.

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They’ve both got eyes, a nose, and a mouth, so why do they look different?

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These lines are the generic way of mapping out where to put things together. I used this when I was starting out and it’s a helpful way of getting your hand and wrist to work together. At this point they both nearly look the same. I say this a lot, but I think it’s important: shape is what puts a drawing together.

Compare features of the face to help you figure out placement.

For example:

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The bottom of his ear lines up right to the middle of his nostril. His tear ducts line up right at the corners of his mouth. Then you can get super technical and say, oh, the outer corner of his eye lines up with that fold in his collar and then from there you can see other things like the approximate distance from the edge of his mouth to that connecting line from the eye to the collar. They don’t meet so his mouth is smaller than the width of his eyes, etc, etc. Whatever works, man.

This is a favorite technique of mine so lemme use another example:

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Eventually you get to the point where most of your proportional accuracy will come from just looking. You will eventually adjust your eye to see what makes a person who they are by the shape of their features.

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Laurence has narrow, oval shaped eyes, while Hugh has more of a diamond shape. Not everyone has perfect almond shaped eyes. You can capture an entire character personality through their eyes alone, so shaping them out is extremely important.

The way you draw your lines is also important. Sharp and smooth lines will give your drawing personality. Reveals the character, in a sense.

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Other things to consider: the shape of the nose.

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Mads’ is flat and goes down in a steady slope, while Hugh’s juts out in a smooth, almost concave curve.

SHAPES SHAPES SHAPES. Use shapes and structure to find proportion.

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I did a lot more than I anticipated omg. Oh gosh and I have a feeling I kinda just rambled and didn’T MAKE ANY SENSE AH. Let me know if you need more help or if I was speaking gibberish I am so bad at putting my thoughts into words aHHHH. But gosh I hope this was at least vaguely helpful. You’re a darling and thank you for your kind words!

Good luck on your artistic endeavors! /hugs

Free Programs for Designers/Students/Creative People

madbiscuitlady:

Or free/open source programs that you can use in place of overly expensive Adobe products. Good if you’re in a pinch or on a budget. I decided to make this list after I installed my new hard drive on my laptop and lost all my adobe programs. So here’s to the open source folks who make our lives better for free.

GIMP

Think free photoshop. I think the only thing keeping GIMP from completely overtaking photoshop is the user interface, which takes some getting used to, and the start up time. It has a huge community and lots of plugins available. It also uses .abr for brushes, so you CAN use your photoshop brushes in GIMP, though depending on what version of PS they were created with, you may need to do some manual converting. There was an independent shell GIMPshop, which was GIMP with a photoshop style user interface, but it hasn’t be updated in ages and seems it doesn’t exist anymore. Don’t be fooled by the site that comes up for it on google it’s full of malware, so don’t go there. Supports Windows, Mac, and Linux.

Inkscape

Substitute for Illustrator. Inkscape is a great tool for creating vector graphics. Like GIMP, it also has a large community and a plethora of extensions available. Also works on Windows, Mac, or Linux.

Scribus

Substitute for In Design, or Quark Express. So book printing, pdf making, poster creation, basically desktop publishing. You will need to install ghostscript in order to work with .eps files. Windows, Mac, or Linux. 

Audacity

Audio recording and editing. Ok, yeah I know the site looks like a relic from ye bygone age of the internet, but it’s a legit program and it’s been around a long time. Good for podcasts. You will need the LAME encoder in order to export to .mp3. Also has plenty of plugins available. Windows, Mac, and Linux supported.

Jahshaka

Free video editing software. This is probably the most fully featured free video editor I’ve come across. It does have a learning curve, but there seems to be a decent amount of tutorial videos available describing the interface and how to use it. Windows, Mac, and Linux supported.

Open Office

Honestly, I don’t know why people still buy the Microsoft stuff, when open office will literally export to the microsoft office file extensions. :| Word processor, spreadsheets, powerpoints, and I believe even an Access equivalent are included. Indispensable. Windows, Mac, and Linux.

(via myfemalegaze)

calantheandthenightingale:

Costume Designs & Gesture Drawings

Okay, so I think I’ve finally worked out what the costumes for my male characters will look like— or at least some of them.  Since not all of my characters are from the same “country,” I know I’ll have to create different types of costumes to reflect their different backgrounds.  But for now I’ve got one set of costumes done, and I’m glad that they didn’t turn out like the typical pseudo- medieval and pseudo-Victorian costumes you often find in fantasy stories.  My inspiration was mainly Indian, Central Asian, Hungarian, and Polish costume. 

Below are the gesture drawings I did to work out different poses.  I still have a really hard time drawing men, so it’s just my luck that AFoR has a mostly male cast :\

milkattack:

when u think yr drawing looks great but then u flip the canvas

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Or just look at it the next day….

(via starrcat)

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

An awing fuck-ton of big cat references.

And here’s a link to a spectacular image that helps distinguish types of big cats. It’s insanely helpful, and you’d be doing yourself a majour disservice if you don’t use it:
http://s3-live.tapcdn.com/images/tap/c/6/3/0/3/50d/644/850/guide-to-big-cats.jpg

Please note that in the first cheetah GIF, the head has been insolated. When running, the head will bob up and down slightly. Not a lot, but just know how the head attaches to the neck and how that moves when the body is oscillating up and down when they run, like in the second GIF.

[From various sources]

(via myfemalegaze)

kada-bura:

My friend showed me this site where you have 45 seconds to draw a pokemon but sometimes it takes like 20 seconds for the reference image to load in and let me tell you my artistic abilities have never shone brighter.

kada-bura:

My friend showed me this site where you have 45 seconds to draw a pokemon but sometimes it takes like 20 seconds for the reference image to load in and let me tell you my artistic abilities have never shone brighter.

(via starrcat)

lavalamp-of-epicness:

I HOPE THIS HELPS. <3

I am not very good at tutorials, but I tried. ;u;

(Edit: OK EVERYTHING IS FINE NOW)

(via myfemalegaze)

Dear Everyone With Smooth Lines in Their Digital Drawings

pigeony:

netbug009:

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on SAI:

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On Photoshop:

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(via turnerstokens)

leseanthomas:

Many of these rates (before taxes, might I add) haven’t changed in 20 years. $100-$250 in 1994 aint the same as in 2014. This is why Comic Book Conventions for many comic illustrators, in many cases, are the lifeblood of their comic making (commissions, direct fan interaction books sales). 

Support your local mainstream or indie comic artist!!!!

Source: http://www.ehow.com/info_8068093_much-artist-make-per-project.html

(via starrcat)

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 
Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.
I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 

Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

amazi-girl's boots should be uggs

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.

I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

image

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

image

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

image

(via rendigo)