Drawing deposit of Yamneko

“Dude, suckin’ at something is the first step to being sorta good at something.”

sacredthemanga:

Hello my dears! :love:

This is a LONG awaited tutorial on how to use Copic markers (the basics) perfect for those who are just starting to use markers. This will help you understand basic blending techniques that, with enough practice, will give you the confidence to explore this awesome medium and develop unique, super fun styles and endless techniques!

So enjoy, explore, learn, and share!

(via clarenceisgod)

squidsalad:

A Tutorial and walk-through of my Copic Coloring process from squidsalad.net Sketch a Day #56 my OC Deva from my comic, Odecomic.com This covers everything from paper selection, to sketching, inking, coloring and highlights.The focus is on blending & shading!

PS- Check out my Kickstarter!! kickstarter.com/projects/anniestoll/squid-salad-makes-merch

:: Orignal sketches are for sale at etsy.com/shop/SquidSaladShop ::

::TOOLS I USED::
Border & Riley #234 Bleedproof Paris Paper
HB Mechanical Pencil
Copic Multiliners
Copic Sketch and Ciao Markers
Pentel Pocketbrush Pen
Z Brush Pen
Windsor & Newton Permanent White Gouache
#000 Small brush

::Technical Credits ::
Adobe Photoshop to scan & Adobe Premiere Pro to edit the video
Font for the captions is Helvetica (muahaha)
Music is free-use from freemusicarchive.org under Creative Commons
by Anne van Schothorst
freemusicarchive.org/music/Anne_van_Schothorst/

(via clarenceisgod)

penstab:

U-um, I don’t know how helpful this tutorial will be, but I’ll try!! I markered these up quickly so it’s not as nice as the actual piece, but I think I got the gist across.
Some initial things; I’m working with copic sketch markers, which have the lovely brush tips that make life worth living, and the lines were done digitally and printed out on some heavy but cheap cardstock. I like coloring on cardstock because it’s thick and absorbent, which makes it slightly more forgiving when you want to blend colors (also: inexpensive!!), but try different papers and see what you like best! Some people don’t like working with absorbent papers.
If you want to save your lineart, you can always photocopy or scan and print copies of it! That way your lines won’t be lost forever if you do mess up. (or, if you want to quickly work on something again for a tutorial, like here… you can just print up another copy!)

I start off with some super pale colors, because unless the hair is very pale, I don’t like my highlights to be pure white. It’s also a good way to practice the strokes you’ll be doing later with darker colors, without worrying about messing up! Don’t worry about any ugly streaks at this stage, since it won’t be visible at all later.
For Yuuya’s hair I played around with color gradients- a greener blue at the top and purple in the shadowed areas, but honestly I don’t think it made any difference by the end. But play around with things like that! It can add subtle but interesting effects.

Then I start laying down my base colors. I roughly figure out where I want my large highlights to be, and then color the rest in quick brush strokes. Don’t try to fill hair in evenly! Let the marker streaking work to your advantage and give the impression of clumps of hair strands. Work in sections, and try to use long, smooth strokes in whatever direction the hair falls in. But again, don’t worry too much if it looks too streaky at this stage.

I go over shadow areas again with the same base colors to plan out where I want my darker colors to go, which helps me keep from messing up later.

And then I start shading! I used fairly quick strokes before, but at this point I start slowing down and working more carefully. Keep working section by section. Resist the urge to try to render every strand of hair!

Shadows! You could keep going like this, shading with progressively darker hues of the same color… but if you ask me, that’s BORING AS HECK.

Slap some other colors in your shadows!!! It’ll make it WAY more interesting to look at! In this case, there will be a lot of purples (and yellows, the complement of purple) in this image, so shading with purple will help tie it all together. Also, it’s pretty! Remember, like watercolors, copics are translucent, so you can layer colors over each other to get some neat effects. Not all colors look nice together, though! So always keep a scrap sheet of the same kind of paper you’re working on to test color combinations on. Try a lot of things!!

penstab:

U-um, I don’t know how helpful this tutorial will be, but I’ll try!! I markered these up quickly so it’s not as nice as the actual piece, but I think I got the gist across.

Some initial things; I’m working with copic sketch markers, which have the lovely brush tips that make life worth living, and the lines were done digitally and printed out on some heavy but cheap cardstock. I like coloring on cardstock because it’s thick and absorbent, which makes it slightly more forgiving when you want to blend colors (also: inexpensive!!), but try different papers and see what you like best! Some people don’t like working with absorbent papers.

If you want to save your lineart, you can always photocopy or scan and print copies of it! That way your lines won’t be lost forever if you do mess up. (or, if you want to quickly work on something again for a tutorial, like here… you can just print up another copy!)

image

I start off with some super pale colors, because unless the hair is very pale, I don’t like my highlights to be pure white. It’s also a good way to practice the strokes you’ll be doing later with darker colors, without worrying about messing up! Don’t worry about any ugly streaks at this stage, since it won’t be visible at all later.

For Yuuya’s hair I played around with color gradients- a greener blue at the top and purple in the shadowed areas, but honestly I don’t think it made any difference by the end. But play around with things like that! It can add subtle but interesting effects.

image

Then I start laying down my base colors. I roughly figure out where I want my large highlights to be, and then color the rest in quick brush strokes. Don’t try to fill hair in evenly! Let the marker streaking work to your advantage and give the impression of clumps of hair strands. Work in sections, and try to use long, smooth strokes in whatever direction the hair falls in. But again, don’t worry too much if it looks too streaky at this stage.

image

I go over shadow areas again with the same base colors to plan out where I want my darker colors to go, which helps me keep from messing up later.

image

And then I start shading! I used fairly quick strokes before, but at this point I start slowing down and working more carefully. Keep working section by section. Resist the urge to try to render every strand of hair!

image

Shadows! You could keep going like this, shading with progressively darker hues of the same color… but if you ask me, that’s BORING AS HECK.

image

Slap some other colors in your shadows!!! It’ll make it WAY more interesting to look at! In this case, there will be a lot of purples (and yellows, the complement of purple) in this image, so shading with purple will help tie it all together. Also, it’s pretty! Remember, like watercolors, copics are translucent, so you can layer colors over each other to get some neat effects. Not all colors look nice together, though! So always keep a scrap sheet of the same kind of paper you’re working on to test color combinations on. Try a lot of things!!

(via clarenceisgod)

cowsgomoose:

A tutorial by me. Because I can. 

I used Paint Tool Sai, Photoshop, and this square brush set. Yup.

Edit: Oh, and I know there are a ton of spelling errors, sorry! D:

(via myfemalegaze)

artofthedarkages:

anglosaxonfragments:

mediumaevum:

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

Rosie Weetch, curator and Craig Williams, illustrator, British Museum

Read the whole blog here: http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2014/05/28/decoding-anglo-saxon-art/

Anglo-Saxon metalworkers were like the Michelangelo of the 8th century!

(via phobs-heh)

ladyloveandjustice:

moonanimate:

Enjoy. :)

Wow, really awesome to see the different animation styles in every frame! What an ambitious project! 

But I’m very sorry, since it’s this particular dub episode, I can’t reblog this without warning anyone who does decide to watch this (and you should for the animation coolness) and hasn’t seen the original Japanese version that the Sailor team and co SERIOUSLY aren’t this constantly and endlessly nasty to each other in the sub. 

1. In the sub Usagi (Serena) was always 100 determined to save Tuxedo Mask and 100 percent committed to the plan she came up with, she definitely never wanted to stop and the others never pressured her into doing it anyway, it was the opposite, they were worried about how dangerous it would be for her. And Usagi wasn’t just trying to rescue Tuxedo Mask (though that was the main goal) but also truly infiltrate the base of the bad guys so the others could follow and destroy the enemy- so she was even willing to let them take her in to accomplish that goal.

2. The fighting between Mars and Moon was not nearly as mean spirited (nor were half on the insults directed towards Serena here even present in the sub). In the sub, rather than say she’d mess up the plan, Rei was worried about Usagi and asked her if she wanted to go through with it, and since Rei is usually so hard on her, Usagi mistook this as belief she wasn’t a competent leader, and they bickered. 

3. Most importantly, REI DID NOT STEAL USAGI’S WAND in the sub. She would have never done something that would have endangered her friend’s life like it. It was the OPPOSITE- Usagi begged Rei to keep the wand for her so there was no way the bad guys could take it off her during her ruse. This was meant to demonstrate Usagi’s absolute trust in Rei and show that despite their bickering, they were really good friends. (Also, it showed Usagi’s commitment to her plan and willingness to risk her own life).

4. Almost as importantly, in the sub, Usagi DID NOT WANT Rei and the others to come save her. She felt if she held out long enough she was going to be able to trick the bad guys into believing she had been abandoned by her friends and truly switch sides. Rather than calling for help here and Rei basically ignoring her pleas, she was internally begging them not to come in the subs and Rei was trying her best to follow her wishes, but broke because she couldn’t stand to see Usagi in pain. 

I know it may not seem important, but these characters were written having really deep, intense bonds, while this dub episode in particular makes them not even feel like friends, or like they even care about each other’s safety…and these characters are important to me, and also this episode REALLY downplays Usagi’s commitment to her cause, so I couldn’t reblog this without stressing it isn’t like this in the original, and the dub changed things.

So watch this video, but I feel better having posted this disclaimer as far as the audio content used. Sorry for the inconvenience, and no disrespect intended to the people who did this project!

jpolgar1:

Around April of last year my friend, Jamie Vickers, encouraged Ben Li and I to apply to animate on Masaaki Yuasa’s “Space Dandy” episode.  Yuasa-san was apparently looking for international animators and posted about it on his Facebook wall.  We turned in our reels and promptly got the gig.

I decided to only take on four shots just to feel it out and to make sure I got it all in on time. 

The Carpaccio animation and shadow passes weren’t used in the final cut, but I decided to include them for this post to show what was turned in and approved.  The rest of the drawings I did came through though!  Very exciting to see the final animation all cleaned up, colored and cut together.

Yuasa-san was very open to us using Flash to animate our shots.  The production took the final keys (genga’s), printed them out, retraced onto paper and inbetweened those drawings.  It’s a pretty wild pipeline, but it totally worked.  I am grateful to have experienced working under one of my most favorite directors, Masaaki Yuasa-san.  

If granted the opportunity I would like to do more animations for Yuasa-san and other overseas productions in the future.  For now I will continue working on my personal project that I aim to get done before the end of the year. 

Space Dandy

Ep 3 Season 2

"Slow and Steady Wins the Race, Baby!"

(via sjellie)

raspbeary:

wow i didnt even answer the question well basically like what i try to do is use bright colors while limiting my palette, you want the bright colors to cover large areas of the drawing but you dont want too many different colors or colors that don’t necessarily look good together

complimentaries are your best friend i stand by this til i die USE COMPLIMENTARY COLORS and understand them because they will help you so much in understanding so many things, not only about art like trust me its crazy how much color theory is involved in daily real life

if ur cel shading make sure that either your dark, light or mid ground color is saturated and bright but always try to keep at least one of those three toned down and neutralized so lets review

limit your palette- look into color theory (watch videos, read about it idk)- understand complimentary colors - dont forget about neutrals and desaturated colors either

Anonymous said: Hi, I just wanted to say that I love your art, and your rockin comics were so inspiring that I've decided to write my own! Any advice for someone totally inexperienced in comic-making? Also, do you have any webcomic recommendations? Thanks <33

strangelykatie:

Oh I’m so glad you’re inspired to make comics!! Just sitting down and creating them and putting them out there has brought SO MANY wonderful things into my life, I can’t stress enough how important it is just to get started!

In terms of advice, here’s what I think has been especially important for me on my journey:

  • READ LOTS OF COMICS! 2 years ago I didn’t have the remotest concept of the broadness and scope of stories that were possible to tell through comics. But there’s honestly SO MUCH there and even though you will definitely forge your own path, it’s great to find work that really speaks to you in the way it tells its story as well as the content itself.
  • START SMALL AND PRACTICE HEAPS! My first ever finished comic was only 8 pages! It was a good length to start with, because it allowed me to see it through without losing courage or motivation - the end was always in sight! Also you can share the finished product much quicker, which is a really good feeling. You’ll also improve wildly as you go, so it’s nice to start out a little smaller and not feel pressured to go back and make changes as you’re working on something/become more aware of your mistakes. That said,
  • MISTAKES ARE COOL AND YOU SHOULD MAKE THEM! It’s way better to make mistakes because you were actually out there doing stuff and trying and experimenting than to not make them at all! I look back and CRINGE so hard at my previous comics but it’s okay - we’re learning all the time, so if you get too hung up on ensuring all your output is of The Highest Possible Standard, you’re gonna spend a lot of time agonizing and revising. Definitely do the best you can, but also breathe and let go.
  • MAKE STUFF YOU REALLY REALLY LIKE! Don’t worry about what a comic “should” be. It should be whatever the hell you damn please. If you wanna draw a hard scifi political thriller, do it. If you wanna draw cute boys working in a cafe, do it. Never ever feel bad.
  • TALK TO OTHER PEOPLE MAKING COMICS! One of the coolest things is that there are SO MANY PEOPLE making amazing comics online right now, and another cool thing is that they’re all super excited about it and are generally pretty dang nice!! Tumblr isn’t bad, but honestly you should grab yourself a Twitter if you haven’t already, it’s where so many comic/webcomic artists hang out and it’s really easy to yell nice things and start conversations!! Peers are really important to have, and a huge part of why I’m still excited about comics every day! I’m so grateful for Twitter for letting me get to know the people I always admired and even work with them and have them in my life!!

As for recs, I definitely have them but this post is already fairly long and I’ve actually been meaning to do a big detailed webcomic recommendation post for a while! So I’ll end this here and ask you to look out for that soon~

I hope this was able to help a little bit! Best of luck with your comics!!

ABOUT MY COPICS

sadynax:

image

Ummmm. Well I suck when I’m trying to tell how I color/use copic markers so here is some photos! I’ll TRY to explain.

——————————

First, here is my copic markers and filling bottles. :)

image

With filling bottles you can make some nice spots and stuff for backgrounds or where ever you like. I don’t use this technique much.

image

Here is my color map! It is VERY useful. (You can find blank maps from google) It’s easy to look for color that you have in your mind, what you wanna mix and stuff. On the corner is some of my fav color.

I usually want to use earth tones, they are my fav colors of them all! I don’t like strong ”rainbow” colors much when I color my pictures but sometimes it’s fun to use them too I guess.

image

I love blending damn everything. I’ll always make some test before I color the actually picture.

I also have some pro-markers just for stripes.

Sometimes I like to use blues/grays/purple colors for shadow. Down there is some color that I use.

image

B60 for shadows

image

V91 for shadow.

image

And here again how I color hair/blend hair. AND ACTUALLY EVERYTHING ELSE :”D

image

Here is some liners that I use for my works.

IF the hair color is very light like pastel, blonde, light sand, white or gray I’ll try to use colored liners, it looks nicer and lighter.

image

And some papers that I use.

image

- Fabriano, Bristol 250g smooth

- some ”manga copic paper” ??

- Winsor & Newton, Bristol paper Extra smooth

————————-

Well I don’t have any tips for people.. Just try everything! You can also use with copics: Other markers, color pencils, dry pastels for top ans some inks too. Water isn’t so good with copics so I don’t recommended watercolors.

End of .. This. I hope someone can find some good stuff out of this.

Thanks and sorry ::: D

becalmthedevil:

storyshots:

Drawing from films

Drawing from films is a ridiculously useful exercise. It’s not enough to watch films; it’s not enough to look at someone else’s drawings from films. If you want to be in story, there’s no excuse for not doing this.

The way this works: you draw tons of tiny little panels, tiny enough that you won’t be tempted to fuss about drawing details. You put on a movie - I recommend Raiders, E.T., or Jaws… but honestly if there’s some other movie you love enough to freeze frame the shit out of, do what works for you. It’s good to do this with a movie you already know by heart.

Hit play. Every time there’s a cut, you hit pause, draw the frame, and hit play til it cuts again. If there’s a pan or camera move, draw the first and last frames.

Note on movies: Spielberg is great for this because he’s both evocative and efficient. Michael Bay is good at what he does, but part of what he does is cut so often that you will be sorry you picked his movie to draw from. Haneke is magnificent at what he does, but cuts so little that you will wind up with three drawings of a chair. Peter Jackson… he’s great, but not efficient. If you love a Spielberg movie enough to spend a month with it, do yourself a favor and use Spielberg.

What to look for:

  • Foreground, middle ground, background: where is the character? What is the point of the shot? What is it showing? What’s being used as a framing device? How does that help tie this shot into the geography of the scene? Is the background flat, or a location that lends itself to depth?
  • Composition: How is the frame divided? What takes up most of the space? How are the angles and lines in the shot leading your eye?
  • Reusing setups, economy: Does the film keep coming back to the same shot? The way liveaction works, that means they set up the camera and filmed one long take from that angle. Sometimes this includes a camera move, recomposing one long take into what look like separate shots. If you pay attention, you can catch them.
  • Camera position, angle, height: Is the camera fixed at shoulder height? Eye height? Sitting on the floor? Angled up? Down? Is it shooting straight on towards a wall, or at an angle? Does it favor the floor or the ceiling?
  • Lenses: wide-angle lens or long lens? Basic rule of thumb: If the character is large in frame and you can still see plenty of their surroundings, the lens is wide and the character is very close to camera. If the character’s surroundings seem to dwarf them, the lens is long (zoomed in).
  • Lighting: Notice it, but don’t draw it. What in the scene is lit? How is this directing your eye? How many lights? Do they make sense in the scene, or do they just FEEL right?

This seems like a lot to keep in mind, and honestly, don’t worry about any of that. Draw 100 thumbnails at a time, pat yourself on the back, and you will start to notice these things as you go.


Don’t worry about the drawings, either. You can see from my drawings that these aren’t for show. They’re notes to yourself. They’re strictly for learning. 

Now get out there and do a set! Tweet me at @lawnrocket and I’ll give you extra backpats for actually following through on it. Just be aware - your friends will look at you super weird when you start going off about how that one shot in Raiders was a pickup - it HAD to be - because it doesn’t make sense except for to string these other two shots together…

Oh hey I was looking for this the other day!

leseanthomas:

Here’s some of the most amazing and invaluable advice you’ll most-likely ever get from one of my good colleagues and legends in comics/gaming, creator JOE MADUREIRA. It’s what i’ve been preaching to you aspiring artists since i arrived on DA, but i think his POV says it perfectly:

*WARNING: SOME MATURE LANGUAGE*

"DO YOU REALLY WANT TO BE A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST? 


Or a successful WORKING PROFESSIONAL?



Believe it or not there is a difference. I’m not usually a soapbox type guy, I don’t like instructing people, and I think I’m a terrible teacher. But hey, it’s Friday and I’m in a strange mood. So here goes:

I’ve noticed that a good number of my fans happen to be aspiring artists themselves. This is for all you guys. I get asked constantly: "Where should I go to school?" "What classes should I take?" "What should I study for anatomy?" "What pencils and paper do you use?" "Should I be working digitally now instead of traditionally?" "How do I fix my poses? Learn composition? Perspective?" "When am I going to develop my own style?" "Who were your influences?" "Teach me how to draw hands!" The list goes on…


Here’s the deal. All of that stuff *is* important, and it may nudge you in the right direction. A lot of it you will discover for yourself. What works best for one person doesn’t work for another. That’s the beauty of art. It’s personal. It’s discovery. DON’T WORRY ABOUT ALL THAT CRAP!

Instead I’m going to answer the questions that you *SHOULD* be asking, but aren’t. These are things that have only recently occurred to me, after doing this for 20+ years. These things seem so obvious, but apparently they elude a lot of people, because I am surprised at how many ridiculously talented artists are 'failing' professionally. Or just unhappy. The beauty of what I’m about to tell you is that it doesn’t matter what field you’re in or what your art style is.

In no particular order:


1) DO WHAT YOU LOVE. If you are passionate about what you’re doing, it shows. If you’re having fun, it shows. If you’re bored, IT SHOWS. Some guys are able to work on stuff they have zero interest in, and still pull off great work, but I find that when I do this my motivation takes a huge hit. And Motivation is key. Money is not a great motivator. It’s temporary like everything else. And honestly, I’ve gotten paid the most money for some of the shittiest work I have ever done. That may sound awesome, but it’s not. And here’s why…

2) You MUST stay Excited and Motivated. Have you noticed that there are days you can’t draw a god damned thing? And some days you feel like you can draw anything? It’s 4am but you don’t notice because you are in the ZONE. Your hand is racing ahead of your mind and you can do no wrong?! Maybe it’s some new paper you got. Or a new program you’ve been wanting to try out. Or you just found some amazing shit on DeviantArt, or watched some movie that just makes you want to run straight to your board. This relates to the above because while it is possible to involve yourself in projects you aren’t excited about—maybe you need the cash, or think it will look good on your resume, whatever it is—it’s not going to last. You need to stay fresh. Expose yourself to new things. New techniques. You should be getting tired of your own shit on a fairly regular basis. Otherwise other people will.

3) Check your Ego. If you think you’re the shit, you’re already doomed. You may be really, really good at what you do, but there’s someone better. Sorry. There’s always plenty to learn, even for us old dogs. So when I meet young upstarts who have this sense of entitlement, or a know-it-all attitude, I just have to laugh. Some of the biggest egos I’ve ever witnessed were from people who have accomplished the least. Meanwhile, most guys who are supremely talented AND successful, and have EARNED the RIGHT to have an ego and throw their weight around, don’t. Why is that? It’s because…

4) RELATIONSHIPS ARE IMPORTANT. This may be one of the biggest lessons I’ve had to learn. Early on, I didn’t value my relationships with people. Creatively or otherwise. I felt like I didn’t need anyone’s help and I could figure everything out on my own. Let’s face it, many of us become artists because we are reclusive, social misfits. We’d rather stay inside and draw shit than go outside and play. We like to live inside our own minds. Why not?! It’s awesome in there! And sometimes we don’t want to let other people in. But like I said—you can’t do it alone. I can honestly say that as much as I try to stay current, as much as I try to push my work and draw kick ass shit that will excite people, I would not be where I am today if it weren’t for all the other people I’ve met and learned from along the way. Guys who pulled strings for me. Took risks on me. Believed I was the right guy for the job. You need to manage your relationships. You need to network, and meet people. Drawing comics is still a pretty good place for reclusive types—but if you want to work in big studios—Making games, Films, animation, basically any other type of job on the planet, you’d better start making some connections. Be likeable. Be professional. That doesn’t mean be an opportunistic ladder climber. Fake people lose in the end. Be yourself, but be professional. It’s no secret that when people are hiring, our first instinct is to bring in people we know. It’s human nature. I don’t like unknowns, even if their portfolio is awesome. If we have a mutual connection, if they have great things to say about you, you’re in. If you have AMAZING artwork to show, and I call your last employer and they tell me what a pain in the ass you are to work with, you’re done. Talent and skill only get you so far. I am literally amazed at how often I meet guys that are total assholes and think they are going to get anywhere.

5) Here’s the BIG ONE. The greatest obstacle you will ever have to overcome IS YOURSELF. And the Fear that you are creating in your own head. Stay positive. Stop defeating yourself. There are artists I know that are so damn good they make me pee my pants. I look up to these mofos. I study their shit and I want to draw like them. And they are almost NEVER working on their DREAM project. And—big surprise, they aren’t happy in their job. “Why NOT?! WTF is WRONG WITH YOU?!” is usually my reaction. And the answer is almost always "The market isn’t great right now" "Other stories/games/comics like mine don’t do very well" "The shit that’s hot right now is nothing like mine, It’s just going to fail." "I’m not sure I’m good enough." "I need the money." "Too Risky." "I tried it before and failed. " It doesn’t matter what words they use, they are afraid for one reason or another. I know. I’ve been there.

But here’s the deal. YOU NEED TO TAKE RISKS. Guess what? YOU ARE MOST LIKELY GOING TO FAIL. If you want it—REALLY want it, that won’t stop you. You will learn A LOT. My good friend Tim constantly jokes about how I jump out of planes without a parachute and worry about the landing on the way down. You may think that I’m lucky, that it’s easy for me to say because I’m already successful, that I’m in a different situation than you all are. But it’s not true. Risk is risk, no matter what level you’re at. If you’re already successful, you just take even bigger risks. But they never go away. Everything in life is Risk vs. Reward. Not just in your career. LIFE. You’d better get used to it.

I didn’t know what the hell I was doing when I got into comics. I left the #1 selling book at the time ( Uncanny X-men ) to work on Battle Chasers during a time when 'Conan' was about the only fantasy comic people knew. And no one was buying it. I wanted to work in games, so I started a game company. I had NO IDEA WTF I was doing. I just wanted it, really bad. We tanked. It failed. No big surprise. But the people I worked with got hired elsewhere and rehired me. I started ANOTHER game Company. We had 4 people and a dream, and some publishers wouldn’t even meet with us, because their ‘next gen console’ teams had 90+ people on them. I literally got hung up on. "Stick to handheld games, it’s smaller, maybe you can handle that…" one MAJOR publisher told us. I don’t blame them. But we didn’t let it stop us. Thank god we didn’t listen to them. Vigil was born. Darksiders happened, AND we got to make a sequel. It stands shoulder to shoulder with the best games in the industry, and the most elite and experienced game dev studios in the world. How is that possible?!!! Hardly any of us had even worked on a console game before. I’ll be honest, I was thinking we would fail the whole time. I just didn’t care. If I had to play the odds on this one, I’d bet against us.

Why am I telling you all this shit? This is not me patting myself on the back. It’s just stuff that has somehow only dawned on me recently when it’s been staring me in the face for so long. I feel like I need to wake you guys up!!! I’ve been limiting myself. I’ve gotten afraid. I’ve taken less risks. I saw my career going places I didn’t want to go. I wasn’t happy and I wasn’t excited. And I’ve realized, that all that stuff I just talked about is the reason I am where I am today. Not because I have a manga style, or I draw cool hands, or there’s energy in my drawings, or all the other things people rattle off to me. There are other guys that do all that same shit, and do it better. And amazingly, those same guys constantly tell me “Man, I wish I could do what you are doing.” “SO DO IT!!!!!” PLEASE listen to me—because I want you guys to make it. I want to look to one of you people for inspiration some day when it’s 2am and I need to keep drawing. Stop worrying about all the other stuff—the pencils, the paper, the anatomy, all that shit. It will only get you so far. You’ve already got most of what you need. I hope this helps some people. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all the support over the years. You are all one of the greatest motivating forces in my life and my career. Sappy but true. Ok, let’s go draw some shit!!!”

(via becalmthedevil)

Don’t like Manga Studio? Get this instead.

naughtyjester:

I know I’ve been basically acting as a clown with a sign outside the Manga Studio shop, but I do realize that some people are just too used to other programs to change now. And that’s fine, if you actually work better with it. But part of the reason I went over to Manga Studio, when I’ve tried Photoshop, SAI, Gimp, FireAlpaca, Sketchbook Pro, and Corel Painter… is because of the exceptional stabilizers and penstroke guides that let you make distinctive shapes, draw easily in perspective, and make it all look highly organic and professional.

Well… for those of you who want to stick with your other art programs… There is Lazy Nezumi Pro.

http://lazynezumi.tumblr.com/

I do not use it. But that’s only because I feel that Manga Studio can already do all this stuff. But I am exceedingly impressed with what LNP has created. They’ve created a program that brings stabilizers, perspective guides, pressure sensitivity editing, and much more to programs that don’t normally have them.

I will just let the images speak for themselves:

image

image

image

image

image

imageimage

This is the exact reason I have strayed from Photoshop. Because of the lack of ARTIST tools, and the profound lack of stability.

Well, here it is. They fixed it. And it works with other programs too.

So… yeah. If you aren’t interested in Manga Studio, but you still want to improve your digital penstrokes, definitely check out the demo.

http://lazynezumi.com/home

keikilanidraws:

sno4wy:

How To Draw Better In 2 Minutes

I expected this to be a troll video about sacrificing your soul in exchange for art skills or something but this was actually very informative.

  • Break Complex creatures into their basic shapes & contours
  • USE REFERENCE IMAGES! Draw what you see, not what you know
  • Rules of thumb for human proportion: eye and ears go in the center of the face, average person is 7.5 heads tall
  • Choose a compelling color palette before you paint
  • Use the entire Value range. Patches Light, dark, not all mid tones!
  • Identify a light source to make certain areas pop
  • For more realism, soften dark edges. Real life doesn’t have black outline.s
  • Background is usually lighter than foreground
  • use foreground details to push depth
  • Keep in mind relative size and perspective. 

(via starrcat)