Drawing deposit of Yamneko

“Dude, suckin’ at something is the first step to being sorta good at something.”

Anonymous said: I was wondering how you manage to make your faces actually look like the person they are meant to look like? Some of my facial features always end up looking the same, and yours are so perfect... *showers you with love* You are my art guru.

thetuxedos:

art guru!!!!

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ART GURU.

BUT NO in all seriousness, thank you! You’re a sweetheart! ;O; Proportions are pretty awful to get down when you’re just starting out, and while there are a bunch of ways you can start practicing with it, it’ll be difficult to be absolutely precise. I still struggle with proportions occasionally. Fun fact: I don’t post all of my work. I only post the work that turned out okay aHA. So basically don’t be frustrated when every single piece doesn’t turn out. Here are a few tips.

Let’s use this picture of Laurence and Hugh because why not.

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They’ve both got eyes, a nose, and a mouth, so why do they look different?

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These lines are the generic way of mapping out where to put things together. I used this when I was starting out and it’s a helpful way of getting your hand and wrist to work together. At this point they both nearly look the same. I say this a lot, but I think it’s important: shape is what puts a drawing together.

Compare features of the face to help you figure out placement.

For example:

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The bottom of his ear lines up right to the middle of his nostril. His tear ducts line up right at the corners of his mouth. Then you can get super technical and say, oh, the outer corner of his eye lines up with that fold in his collar and then from there you can see other things like the approximate distance from the edge of his mouth to that connecting line from the eye to the collar. They don’t meet so his mouth is smaller than the width of his eyes, etc, etc. Whatever works, man.

This is a favorite technique of mine so lemme use another example:

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Eventually you get to the point where most of your proportional accuracy will come from just looking. You will eventually adjust your eye to see what makes a person who they are by the shape of their features.

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Laurence has narrow, oval shaped eyes, while Hugh has more of a diamond shape. Not everyone has perfect almond shaped eyes. You can capture an entire character personality through their eyes alone, so shaping them out is extremely important.

The way you draw your lines is also important. Sharp and smooth lines will give your drawing personality. Reveals the character, in a sense.

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Other things to consider: the shape of the nose.

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Mads’ is flat and goes down in a steady slope, while Hugh’s juts out in a smooth, almost concave curve.

SHAPES SHAPES SHAPES. Use shapes and structure to find proportion.

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I did a lot more than I anticipated omg. Oh gosh and I have a feeling I kinda just rambled and didn’T MAKE ANY SENSE AH. Let me know if you need more help or if I was speaking gibberish I am so bad at putting my thoughts into words aHHHH. But gosh I hope this was at least vaguely helpful. You’re a darling and thank you for your kind words!

Good luck on your artistic endeavors! /hugs

Free Programs for Designers/Students/Creative People

madbiscuitlady:

Or free/open source programs that you can use in place of overly expensive Adobe products. Good if you’re in a pinch or on a budget. I decided to make this list after I installed my new hard drive on my laptop and lost all my adobe programs. So here’s to the open source folks who make our lives better for free.

GIMP

Think free photoshop. I think the only thing keeping GIMP from completely overtaking photoshop is the user interface, which takes some getting used to, and the start up time. It has a huge community and lots of plugins available. It also uses .abr for brushes, so you CAN use your photoshop brushes in GIMP, though depending on what version of PS they were created with, you may need to do some manual converting. There was an independent shell GIMPshop, which was GIMP with a photoshop style user interface, but it hasn’t be updated in ages and seems it doesn’t exist anymore. Don’t be fooled by the site that comes up for it on google it’s full of malware, so don’t go there. Supports Windows, Mac, and Linux.

Inkscape

Substitute for Illustrator. Inkscape is a great tool for creating vector graphics. Like GIMP, it also has a large community and a plethora of extensions available. Also works on Windows, Mac, or Linux.

Scribus

Substitute for In Design, or Quark Express. So book printing, pdf making, poster creation, basically desktop publishing. You will need to install ghostscript in order to work with .eps files. Windows, Mac, or Linux. 

Audacity

Audio recording and editing. Ok, yeah I know the site looks like a relic from ye bygone age of the internet, but it’s a legit program and it’s been around a long time. Good for podcasts. You will need the LAME encoder in order to export to .mp3. Also has plenty of plugins available. Windows, Mac, and Linux supported.

Jahshaka

Free video editing software. This is probably the most fully featured free video editor I’ve come across. It does have a learning curve, but there seems to be a decent amount of tutorial videos available describing the interface and how to use it. Windows, Mac, and Linux supported.

Open Office

Honestly, I don’t know why people still buy the Microsoft stuff, when open office will literally export to the microsoft office file extensions. :| Word processor, spreadsheets, powerpoints, and I believe even an Access equivalent are included. Indispensable. Windows, Mac, and Linux.

(via myfemalegaze)

calantheandthenightingale:

Costume Designs & Gesture Drawings

Okay, so I think I’ve finally worked out what the costumes for my male characters will look like— or at least some of them.  Since not all of my characters are from the same “country,” I know I’ll have to create different types of costumes to reflect their different backgrounds.  But for now I’ve got one set of costumes done, and I’m glad that they didn’t turn out like the typical pseudo- medieval and pseudo-Victorian costumes you often find in fantasy stories.  My inspiration was mainly Indian, Central Asian, Hungarian, and Polish costume. 

Below are the gesture drawings I did to work out different poses.  I still have a really hard time drawing men, so it’s just my luck that AFoR has a mostly male cast :\

milkattack:

when u think yr drawing looks great but then u flip the canvas

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Or just look at it the next day….

(via starrcat)

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

An awing fuck-ton of big cat references.

And here’s a link to a spectacular image that helps distinguish types of big cats. It’s insanely helpful, and you’d be doing yourself a majour disservice if you don’t use it:
http://s3-live.tapcdn.com/images/tap/c/6/3/0/3/50d/644/850/guide-to-big-cats.jpg

Please note that in the first cheetah GIF, the head has been insolated. When running, the head will bob up and down slightly. Not a lot, but just know how the head attaches to the neck and how that moves when the body is oscillating up and down when they run, like in the second GIF.

[From various sources]

(via myfemalegaze)

kada-bura:

My friend showed me this site where you have 45 seconds to draw a pokemon but sometimes it takes like 20 seconds for the reference image to load in and let me tell you my artistic abilities have never shone brighter.

kada-bura:

My friend showed me this site where you have 45 seconds to draw a pokemon but sometimes it takes like 20 seconds for the reference image to load in and let me tell you my artistic abilities have never shone brighter.

(via starrcat)

lavalamp-of-epicness:

I HOPE THIS HELPS. <3

I am not very good at tutorials, but I tried. ;u;

(Edit: OK EVERYTHING IS FINE NOW)

(via myfemalegaze)

Dear Everyone With Smooth Lines in Their Digital Drawings

pigeony:

netbug009:

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????????????????????????

on SAI:

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On Photoshop:

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(via turnerstokens)

leseanthomas:

Many of these rates (before taxes, might I add) haven’t changed in 20 years. $100-$250 in 1994 aint the same as in 2014. This is why Comic Book Conventions for many comic illustrators, in many cases, are the lifeblood of their comic making (commissions, direct fan interaction books sales). 

Support your local mainstream or indie comic artist!!!!

Source: http://www.ehow.com/info_8068093_much-artist-make-per-project.html

(via starrcat)

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 
Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.
I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 

Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

amazi-girl's boots should be uggs

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.

I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

image

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

image

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

image

(via rendigo)

harukami:

Hello friends I am about to run out the door for work but before I do one more thing about writing!

I see a lot of people say “I suck” or “I feel so bad compared to (other author)” or “I could write this but I’m not sure what the point is when (other writer) would do it better” or even just “I wrote something but I don’t want to show anyone because I know it’s terrible.”

And I want to tell you to have confidence in yourself and that too is an important part of writing!

Confidence obviously can’t just come from nowhere — but it comes from practice being confident. When you say “This isn’t the piece I wanted it to be” instead of “this story sucks and I suck” you’re assessing what you wanted versus what you did, you’re not assessing personal value. If you say “I know someone may be able to tell this story better but I want to see the specific way I’d tell this story”, you are enabling growth, while “I won’t write this because x would do it better” is shutting yourself down.

Basically, keep in mind that you start at a point and by practicing you improve little by little. This goes for both writing and confidence. The reason why we learn to stand up in front of a class and give a presentation even if terrified, and eventually get used to doing it even if we’re not comfortable is that confidence is a skill that can be practiced. It’s important to give yourself permission to do things. Give yourself permission to show your work to others. Give yourself permission to write the things you want to write even if it’s indulgent. Give yourself permission to enjoy the things you’ve done even if you don’t think it’s as good as it could be.

There’s this thing in shounen manga and series you might have seen about assessment of strength. The true beginner has no idea how strong they are, compared to the people around them. When they start to develop the skill to see their own strength they realize how weak they are comparatively and need to train. A lot of times, when you say “I suck at this”, what has happened is that you have reached the stage of recognizing your current level of practice and its output compared to other people’s. And it is okay to not be the best immediately. You need to go on your training arc. And it won’t be a dragonball arc where you do a year’s training in a day or whatever that was I haven’t watched dragonball. But if you give yourself permission to enjoy what you’re working on now when knowing it’s not where you COULD be, you can get confidence in what you can currently do and aim for bigger things in the future.

And the thing is there is actualy no top end, I’m pretty sure? I am at the stage where I can more or less accurately assess my own ‘strength’ in shounen writing terms, and I can see how much further I can develop and be excited by it. And it’s exciting! It’s frustrating, but it’s exciting. I know my weaknesses and I want to reach the day when I look back at my writing and think “aha! When I wrote this, I couldn’t do x very well, and now I can! That’s amazing!”

I managed to find one of the oldest fanfics I ever wrote the other day. It was on fortunecity and had been taken down years ago, but I randomly stumbled across a zip file someone had uploaded with saved text files of various sailor moon fics, and found a couple of mine. I wrote them 18 years ago.  And I read it expecting to be horrified, but was so happy that I’ve reached a stage in my writing where instead I thought “for a 13 year old who hadn’t practiced much, it was pretty good” and could be happy seeing all the places I’d developed instead of being embarrassed.

And I definitely haven’t always been at that point. That’s a skill that can be developed. And it’s important to develop it because people WILL be critical of you, you WILL get rejections if you do original stuff and flames if you do fan stuff and so on. It’s not so much toughening as becoming more flexible and kinder to yourself. And if you do the comparison thing and feel disenheartened, if you tell yourself your story sucks, you will be holding yourself back. It’s hard not to! But practice forgiving yourself, practice giving yourself permission. You can’t expect to be at your destination on a road trip as soon as you leave, and saying “Why aren’t we there yet” when you’re driving just makes it more frustrated. Turn on some music, look out the windows, enjoy the trip you’re taking. That’s hard too, but practice letting go.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

(via rendigo)

Landscape/Environment Tut

badasserywoman:

Okay so i got a few notes on how i go about Environments/Landscapes…so i’ll share a method thats easy to work with….bare with me its been a little while since ive drawn them Lol

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First thing you want to start of with in your gradient background…use what ever is your preference. Depends on the setting, ima do some type of desert/dusty place.

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You’ll learn that the Lasso tool is gonna be your bae when it comes to environments…that and its pretty useful. Now your going to be working in three tones, 1.Dark 2.Mid 3.Light and it will always be the darkest at the front fading to light towards the back…make sense? So you will have three layers for each one to make your life easier and Lock those layers so you will only color within that area. Make sure the dark layer is on top. 

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Here is where the fun kicks in…we add our dets, try to stay with each tone and dont end up making it all muddy so you cant distinguish each one. Now you can go about this any way you please, you can paint it all in with one brush ( for some reason people get anal about shit like that, thinking there great for using one brush…i think if you got tools use em if you know how to do it right.) Or you can use custom brushes…since this is a tut ill mostly use custom brushes to slap stuff around. Its up to you really, also use the lasso tool like i said its your bae.

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The lasso can help define things better for you, so i wanted to add a structure type on the third layer. If you want to give an effect that the selection ive made is in front of the background right click your selection and invert it, add some lighting around the edges…only a little though you dont want to over do it.

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Also if you’ve done something on a layer you dont want to mess up or paint on what you can do is create a clipping mask on that layer. Its kinda like locking the layer to that one so you dont go outside of the layer or ruin what you worked on. Make a new layer above the one you wish to attach it to and right click the newlayer, a menu will pop up, your looking for clipping mask. Once you clicked it the layer should look like what ive circled. 

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Once your done working on each layer we are gonna put in some mist effect, this is something that helps separate each section. So make a new layer between each of your three as shown in the image. Like i said you can use what ever method you like, i just use a soft brush or cloud/mist brush to get what i want. 

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Now we are going to add some definition to the image a good one to use is Curves. You can find this where your layer menu is, at the bottom you’ll find it, ive circled what your looking for. On the third image is what will appear when you click curves, all you need to do is drag the little square and you’ll see some magic happen. So adjust it to your preference. If you want you can also mess with brightness/contrast too. ALSO i would recommend adding a person in the image, it gives you an idea of the scale your environment is.

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I was going to end it there but hey, ill show one last thing…its pretty simple. and that is some water reflection, we are going to turn the middle into water instead cause its a little boring right now. I merged all layers but the first one, you then want to make a selection and copy/paste. Free transform in the shortcut is ctrl T and do a vertical flip on it then adjust so its mirroring the top. 

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Now make a clipping mask like i explained earlier on the reflected surface and use the radiant tool…i think its called that lol it gives it more of a water surface like you see. For the image below it i used a custom brush which creates a water effect, aaaaaaaaaand bam you got you water now covering the area…easy huh. 

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And so this concludes the Tutorial and you have the end result. Hopefully that gave some tips on how to approach landscapes…they can be confusing sometimes on where to start. Enjoy and let me know if it was useful or not :P

(via rendigo)

coelasquid:

Art School consumption of graphic media:

Wow these proportions are so bad this artist is terrible how do they get work we should all redline these to show how much better we could do them if they hired people like us

Professional Life consumption of graphic media:

"Poor dude probably had to draw like eighty panels that day, I hope he didn’t have to spend his whole weekend doing weird revisions marketing came up with"

(via chuuface)

senshistock:

Available now! SenshiStock Sketch is a web app that lets your jump through random SenshiStock images for sketch, gesture and warm up drawing.
Use the timer for shorter or longer poses, hit the random button for a new pose at any time. Pause if you need a bit more time with a pose!
Happy drawing!

senshistock:

Available now! SenshiStock Sketch is a web app that lets your jump through random SenshiStock images for sketch, gesture and warm up drawing.

Use the timer for shorter or longer poses, hit the random button for a new pose at any time. Pause if you need a bit more time with a pose!

Happy drawing!